Top 10 Underrated Critters

CNSCBlog

By Jesse Shirton Chances are when you think of a Churchill animal, you probably think of a polar bear. Understandably so, considering Churchill is the polar bear capital of the world. Every year (global pandemic notwithstanding) people travel from around the world to see these amazing animals. Or perhaps if you did not think of the polar bear you thought … Read More

A Race Against Winter: Fall Fieldwork at CNSC

CNSCBlog

The science team after an intensive data and sample collecting weekend

Fall is often a time of change – and Churchill is no exception. The vegetation changes colour, migratory birds seek better weather, nights start getting colder, and the town transitions into what during a normal year would be a bustling polar bear season. At the CNSC, the fall means that the window for completing many outdoor projects will shortly be … Read More

Educational Walks at CNSC

CNSCBlog

After being closed for several months, things are starting to open up again at the Centre. We welcomed researchers from Western Canada at the beginning of August, and currently have three research groups from Manitoba staying with us.  Although the doors to the big blue building aren’t open on a drop-in basis yet, we are offering outdoor educational walks. We … Read More

Rules for Fieldwork

CNSCBlog

Over our travels on tundra, water, ice, and through boreal forest, we have learned some simple rules to keep things running smoothly as a team of research technicians. While they are all guidelines, and a bit tongue in cheek, each one has a story behind it and offers a glimpse into our daily thoughts and lives. Please enjoy our “Rules … Read More

Lessons from an Amateur Birder

CNSCBlog

By Danielle Chiasson When I moved to Churchill last year I was excited to walk the subarctic landscape and see plants and animals I had only ever dreamed about. Polar bears, belugas, arctic foxes, caribou! But when I arrived in mid-May, my first thought was “why are there so many darned geese around!?”. I had read about the large diversity … Read More

Signs of Spring

CNSCBlog

A spruce tree in the Hudson bay lowlands after spring snow melt

Spring reflects signs of new beginnings. Flowers bloom and trees bud, but spring in Churchill looks a little different. Here we are at the beginning of June, still with snow on the ground, temperatures fluctuating between -5 and +5 degrees Celsius, and freezing rain dominating the last couple weeks of May. Despite winter desperately trying to stick around, spring is … Read More

Ice ice baby: First winter in the subarctic

CNSCBlog

This year brought many new staff to Churchill Northern Studies Centre. We asked each of them for their personal take on their first winter in Churchill. Please enjoy seeing a subarctic winter through the eyes of these subarctic rookies.  Erica Gillis, Research Intern It was the thought of spending a winter in the subarctic that originally drew me to Churchill. … Read More

Winter Wrap Up 2020

CNSCBlog

By Danielle Chiasson Now that the snow is melting in Churchill, the temperatures are creeping up above freezing, and the first migratory birds are passing through, we thought it would be a good idea to reflect on Winter 2020 before embracing the arrival of Spring. In February, visitors from around the world began to arrive in Churchill to experience the … Read More

A Semester in the Subarctic

CNSCBlog

Jordan, looking out of an igloo she built during her semester in the subartic

My name is Jordan Amatuzio, I am currently an Environmental Studies student at the University of Manitoba. This winter I had the incredible opportunity to spend the final co-op work term of my undergraduate degree as the Programming Assistant at the Churchill Northern Studies Centre (CNSC). When I first saw the posting for the position at the CNSC the idea … Read More

Four in the Far North

CNSCBlog

Fieldwork in Greenland: Gracie with Saxifraga tricuspidata flowering in the foreground.

by Eric DeChaine, Professor of Biology, Curator of the Pacific Northwest Herbarium Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington, U.S.A. I am a naturalist at heart, striving to better understand the natural world: the diversity of species, their environment, and their interactions. Unfortunately, we are currently losing biological diversity faster than at any time in human history. So, the challenge is to … Read More